Skip to content

A Prayer for Those Affected by Ebola

As you can see from the citation at the end of today’s blog, this was written by  Rev. Frederick Yebuah and is from our Board of Discipleship.  I think it’s too timely and too well-written not to share with you, so as we say, “Let us pray….”

A Prayer for Those Affected by Ebola

Gracious God, we call you the Great Physician.
We pray your healing power to touch those bodies that now shake with fever, ache with pain, and are too weak to sustain the demands of life.

Gracious God, we know you are a Mighty God.

Grant access to medical care for the most vulnerable in West Africa.
Protect doctors and nurses who kneel at the bedsides of the sick and the dying.
Provide resources in places of lack.  Guide churches and church leaders.
Empower all who work tirelessly to be Christ’s hands and feet.

Gracious God, we believe you are Hope for the hopeless.  Hold parents who’ve lost children.
Gently father and mother children who’ve lost their parents.
Make your presence known to those who are dying alone, in the streets, in wastelands, without friends or family.
Speak tenderly to all who feel abandoned by the world’s governments and systems of power.
Give strength to our friends in West Africa who feel that “life more abundantly” is an unfulfilled promise.

Gracious God, we know you are the Light overcoming darkness.
Why should we be afraid?
Help us, O God, to trust in your unchanging nature in times of uncertainty.
Grant us peace that Ebola or anything in this life that would threaten to undo us, is not impossible for you.
Hear our prayer.
Amen.

Excerpted from, “A Litany in Response to UMCOR’s Call to Pray for Those Affected by the Ebola Epidemic” by the Rev. Frederick Yebuah for The United Methodist Board of Discipleship.

It’s Not Just the Car I Drive

Essentialism is a book I first heard about on The Wharton School of Business channel on SiriusXM Radio.  The author was a fascinating interview, and his writings are even better.

Oddly enough, he quotes John Maxwell in Essentialism.  John is a former pastor in the Wesleyan tradition who has sold several million books and is now a motivational speaker and business consultant.  I’ve been reading and listening to him since way back when he was still pastoring a church.

“You cannot overestimate the unimportance of practically everything,” Essentialism quotes John as saying.  Harsh?  Trite?  Or accurate?  Your call.

Meanwhile, Essentialism‘s premise and that fascinating John Maxwell line have been haunting me for quite a while now.

“You cannot overestimate the unimportance of practically everything” reminds me that Focus is more than the car I drive.

It Happened at Church Camp

You’ve been there.  You’ve done a spectacular job.  But nobody noticed.

And you’ve been here, too.  You’ve simply fulfilled your responsibilities.  To the best of your abilities.  But again, nobody noticed.

Or…maybe somebody did.

For example, Melissa Etheridge noticed this: “I started playing 12-string (guitar) when I was 14,” she says,because someone “at church camp had one at just sounded so beautiful.”

Imagine that.  It happened “at church camp.”

You’ve been there.  Maybe it was called Vacation Bible School.  Or a nursing home.  Or a place the rest of us wouldn’t ever think of.

But you’ve been there.

You’ve made a difference.

Someone noticed.

And That’s from A Money Guy

The current issue of Barron’s, “The Dow Jones Business and Financial Weekly,” highlights their annual list of Top 100 Financial Advisors.

Ron Carson is one of the best of the best.  He and his team manage $4.3 billion…with a “b.”

“True wealth is all you have that money can’t buy,” says Carson, “and that death can’t take away.”

And that’s from a money guy.

Let’s Go, part 3

 When they said,

“Let’s go to the house of God,

    my heart leaped for joy.

— Psalm 122

Who was it who first said to you something along the lines of “Let’s go to the house of God?”

The Rest

We give hearty thanks for the rest of the past night

and for the gift of a new day,

with its opportunities of pleasing you.

Grant that we may so pass its hours

in the perfect freedom of your service,

that at eventide we may again

give thanks to you.  Amen.

 —from the Eastern Orthodox tradition,

#676 in our current United Methodist Hymnal

You and I get excited over lotsa stuff.

We could easily name several examples…and there are probably a few best keep private at the moment.

Maybe we haven’t taken time to intentionally give hearty thanks for the rest of this past night.

 If the rest of this past night has ever been elusive, that line takes on special significance.

Here’s some ancient context for us: “In vain you rise early and stay up late, toiling for food to eat– for God grants sleep to those God loves.”  — Psalm 127:2

Focus right now on the “God grants sleep” part with me, and let’s be thankful.

In fact, let’s give hearty thanks for the rest of this past night.

Hearty

We give hearty thanks for the rest of the past night

and for the gift of a new day,

with its opportunities of pleasing you.

Grant that we may so pass its hours

in the perfect freedom of your service,

that at eventide we may again

give thanks to you.  Amen.

 —from the Eastern Orthodox tradition,

#676 in our current United Methodist Hymnal

There’s a big holiday on the horizon.

Its name is one thing and its focus is often another.

Thanksgiving in our culture has become about travel, food, family and football.

Thanksgiving Services often include something along the lines of “It’s not about thanks-GIVING, it’s about thanks-LIVING.”  It’s true.

A great way to rehearse that is with this prayer’s opening phrase: We give hearty thanks.

Let’s you and me give hearty thanks today.

As my congregations must get tired of hearing me say, There is so much to celebrate.

But there really is.

That’s why We give hearty thanks.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.